Traditional weaving in Mexico and Central America

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Click here to see these huipils! Click here to see this back strap loom! Click here to see this doll! Click here to see this ensemble! Click here to see this supported spindle!

People in Mesoamerica have woven fabric using cotton, maguey, and wool for centuries. Using simple spindles and looms they create a wide range of unique colorful fabrics and clothing. While the technology used to spin and weave fabric is very similar throughout Mesoamerica, each culture and region creates their own unique designs.

As commercial yarns and materials have become available, indigenous weavers have embraced new colors and materials while maintaining the unique flavor of their traditional designs.

Click on the image for more information on each artifact.

Exhibit developed by Kathryn McCloud & Dr. Bryan Howard

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2 responses to “Traditional weaving in Mexico and Central America”

  1. khadija says :

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