Hungarian culture area

DSC_0005More than 12,000 people either born in Hungary or of Hungarian descent now live in Texas. As with people from many lands and cultures who have contributed to the growth and development of Texas, the accomplishments of the Hungarians are many. But what they have achieved has not come without conflict, change, and adaptation of their traditional values and identity.

Hungary, today a small Central European nation, proudly chronicles 1,100 years of history, beginning with the arrival of the Hungarian, or Magyar, tribes from the East. By the early 1800’s the kingdom included many minorities, including Germans, Rumanians, South Slavs, Slovaks, and Jews. All took part in the migration to America and Texas, places which were, if anything, even more polyglot than Hungary. In Texas, Hungarian immigrants formed part of a new multicultural society which has taken shape over the past 150 years.

Hungarians immigrated to Texas for two reasons. Political exiles include the “48ers” of the failed Hungarian Revolution of 1848-1849, and the refugees of post-World War II Soviet occupation a century later. Many others, who arrived between 1880 and 1920, were motivated by economic reasons. Each movement was distinct, but all shared similar adaptation experiences.

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