Object: Birdcage

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I-0198aa
Birdcage
Unknown,  likely Texan
Late 20th Century
Materials: Bamboo

This object is a birdcage made of bamboo and designed to resemble a cathedral. The structure is held together with small pins  of bamboo and a small amount of adhesive in some of the more delicate areas. The joints are created by taking the two pieces to be joined and drilling holes into them, then placing a smaller piece of bamboo into the holes to hold the two larger pieces together.

Bamboo

Bamboo trees in Kyoto, Japan. Image via Wikimedia Commons

Bamboo is a plant that can grow almost anywhere with little effort. At one time it was found on every continent except Antarctica and Europe. The plant is most commonly associated with Southeast Asia, but there are many different types of bamboo grown around the globe. It is one of the fastest growing plants in the world and some varieties of bamboo can live for more than 120 years. There are anywhere from 1,200 to 1,500 different species in the world. Bamboo is a major food source for many different animals, such as the giant panda, red panda and Madagascar‘s bamboo lemur.

Bamboo releases more oxygen into the air and absorbs more carbon dioxide than other plants, which can be very helpful from an environmental perspective. It grows back quickly, allowing it to be cut down as needed without to the worry of the years it would take a normal tree to grow back. Bamboo reaches maturity within 3-5 years unlike many other plants. Many countries count on this renewable resource. Bamboo is also used to prevent soil erosion in places that are having excessive deforestation.

Bamboo is as strong as steel, allowing it to be used as construction material for walls, floors, furniture and art. Many of the objects that we use every day could be made of bamboo. For instance, wooden spatulas or spoons, cutting boards, patio furniture, baskets, or even cabinets. Here in Texas there are several different types of bamboo that can be grown safely and successfully. [Abby Goode, edited by Jennifer McPhail]

Additional Resources:
Bal, Lalit Mohan, Lalit Mohan Bal, Lalit Mohan Bal, and P. Sudhakar. 2012. “Bamboo shoot: a potential source of food security”. Mediterranean Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism. 5 (1): 1-10. 

Lucas, Susanne. 2013. Bamboo.

Zea Escamilla, Edwin, and G. Habert. 2014. “Environmental impacts of bamboo-based construction materials representing global production diversity”. Journal of Cleaner Production. 69 (1): 117-127.

Advertisements

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Schoonover Farm Blog

This is the blog for our little farm in Skagit county. Here we raise Shetland sheep, Nigerian Dwarf goats, and Satin Angora rabbits. In addition we have donkeys, llamas, cattle, pigs, chickens, geese, ducks, peafowl and pheasants. The blog describes the weekly activities here.

The TARL Blog

Experimenting with collections access since 2013

Museum Anthropology

Experimenting with collections access since 2013

Center for the Future of Museums

Experimenting with collections access since 2013

TAMEC

Experimenting with collections access since 2013

Smithsonian Collections Blog

Experimenting with collections access since 2013

Digital Scholarship in the Humanities

Exploring the digital humanities

ethnology @ snomnh

experimenting with social microexhibitions since 2007

%d bloggers like this: